Between the Two of Us, We Can Speak English


Me: learnt? Is that a word? Isn’t it learned?
Varun: No! The past tense of learn is learnt. I learnt that.
Me: Really? Hmm..maybe it’s a british thing. (Thumbs through dictionary). Nope, both work.
Me:(Continuing to read): Spent? Isn’t it spended? Oh wait.
Varun: (laughter)

(He loves those moments)

In the weeks before I started this blog, I spent a lot of time thinking about it and discussing with Varun the pros and cons of opening our lives to public scrutiny. The name was a given: my coworker thought of it and it stuck. Enter Mistake #1 of all relationships: The Assumption. I assumed Varun knew what “ESL” meant and why it was funny. So I went on for weeks laughing and dreaming about this blog.

Until one day.
Varun: What does ESL mean?
Me: (Shocked) (Can I laugh?)(How has he not asked me this before?) (Shocked) This. It’s this.

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Lynsey
    Dec 09, 2010 @ 22:40:05

    Your conversation about the suffix ed is kind of interesting because it actually has three sounds, /id/ /t/ and /d/. It never sounds like ed. So things get confusing especially when it comes to spelling. Anyway, a little tidbit from my tutoring. The things they never teach you, but oh can make so much of a difference. English, why do you have be so confusing?!

    Reply

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